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Home VOL 20, NO 2 (2012) Volume 20 Number 2 January 2012
Volume 20 Number 2 January 2012


Volume 20 Number 2: January 2012

Historical Population Movements in North and Northeast Thailand

Kennon Breazeale*

This paper examines patterns of resettlement in north and northeast Thailand and in adjacent areas of Burma and Laos. The time period is limited mainly to the late-eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, owing to lack of sources for earlier periods. Difficulties in finding and interpreting quantitative data and their limitations are discussed. Patterns are described by major category (refugees, economic migrants and forced resettlement) and by ethnic group. Government policies are discussed in terms of defensive measures in relation to potential invasions by foreign armies and to resettled people as assets for the state. The paper ends with a theory of recurrent depopulation and repopulation patterns extending back more than 500 years.

Keywords: depopulation, economic migration, forced resettlement, refugees


* Kennon Breazeale is a Projects Coordinator of the East-West Center and an affiliate graduate faculty member of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies of the University of Hawaii. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . His work on the history of Thailand and Mainland Southeast Asia includes Culture in Search of Survival: The Phuan of Thailand and Laos (with Snit Smuckarn, Yale University. Southeast Asia Studies, 1988), From Japan to Arabia: Ayutthaya's Maritime Relations with Asia (Toyota Thailand Foundation and Textbooks Foundation, 1999), Breaking New Ground in Lao History: Essays on the Seventh to Twentieth Centuries (with Mayoury Ngaosrivathana, Silkworm Books, 2002), and The Writings of Prince Damrong Rajanubhab: A Chronology with Annotations (Toyota Thailand Foundation and Textbooks Foundation, 2008). He has also translated and annotated two books by Prince Damrong Rajanubhab: Journey through Burma in 1936: A View of the Culture, History and Institutions (River Books, 1999) and A Biography of King Naresuan the Great (Toyota Thailand Foundation and Textbooks Foundation, 2008).

 

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Volume 20 Number 2: January 2012

Toward an Historical Demography of Thailand

Amornrat Bunnag,* Rossarin Soottipong Gray,** and Peter Xenos**

In this paper we review the rapidly changing field of historical demography, outlining how the field has advanced over the last seven decades or so, particularly with respect to methodologies, and pointing to the contributions the field has made to social history. Then we turn to the social and economic history of Siam and review what is known from existing studies of Siam's historical population trends. We indicate why demography is central to historical social change in Southeast Asia generally and in Siam in particular. In light of its importance in Siam's social and economic history, we consider why so little empirical historical demography has been carried out. Finally, we provide an overview of materials in the nation's historical collections that might provide a basis for an historical demography for Thailand.

Keywords: historical demography, demographic accounts, Siam, Thailand


 

* Center of Doctrine and Strategic Development, Army Training Command, currently a Ph.D. candidate, Doctoral Program in Demography. Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
** Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University

 

This paper is based on the doctoral research of the first author while pursuing her Ph.D. degree in the Doctoral Program in Demography, Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University. The authors gratefully acknowledge financial support from the Royal Golden Jubilee Ph.D. Program (Grant No. PHD/0183/2549). Thanks also go to members of the dissertation committee whose thoughtful comments are reflected in this paper.

 

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Volume 20 Number 2: January 2012

Online Information Resources: Thai Students' Research in the Digital Culture

Taweesak Sangkapreecha1 and Pataraporn Sangkapreecha2

This research aims to highlight the specific online information sources the students use to obtain information for their study. It not only analyses how the students navigate various types of sources on the internet but also explains how they respond to different types of problems that are raised. Undertaking this study with 21 postgraduate students, we did the focus group discussions as well as redesigned and further developed an online data capturing technique by mixing quantitative and qualitative approaches. This is a technique integrating a number of currently available online technologies, which normally exist in isolation; namely a social networking system, a proxy server, and an online real-time-supporting service. Altogether, these design innovations enabled us to collect contextual information during observational studies and follow-up on interesting subject matters raised by participants. We found that the key online information gateways and sources the students used to obtain the information for their studies are Google, Wikipedia, Weblogs and Academic and Government domains. Our argument has suggested that the students' attitude and value to the online information resources highlights important issues to do with economic and cultural capital (dis)advantage regarding Thai education culture in this digital age.

Keywords: online information resources, students' internet research, digital culture


1 Lecturer, Interior Design Department, School of Fine and Applied Arts, Bangkok University, Thailand. Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
2 Assistant Professor, Broadcasting Department, School of Communication Arts, Bangkok University, Thailand.

The authors are greatly thankful to Dr. Catriona Elder, the University of Sydney, for her assistance and supports. Many thanks also go to postgraduate students at Bangkok University for providing us useful data.

 

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Volume 20 Number 2: January 2012

Incompleteness of Registration Data on Centenarians in Thailand

Sutthida Chuanwan1, Pramote Prasartkul2, Aphichat Chamratrithirong3, Patama Vapattanawong4, Charles Hirschman5

This study aims to estimate the number of centenarians—the population aged 100 years and over, and to assess the quality of registration data about the elderly population in Thailand. Data were taken from population censuses, life tables constructed from the Survey of Population Change (SPC), regional model life tables, and records in civil registration. Life expectancies of centenarian cohorts were derived from SPC life tables. Model life tables of corresponding levels were applied to determine survival ratios. These ratios were then applied to census population data for 2000 to estimate the number of centenarians still surviving in 2010. These demographic procedures yielded an estimate of about 1,700 surviving centenarians in 2010, which was only 12 percent of the number recorded in official civil registration figures. The inflated estimates of the centenarian population recorded by the civil registration system were investigated by in-depth interviews of the centenarians, village/sub-district headmen, registrars, and relatives of deceased persons in two selected provinces. Names and addresses of centenarians were acquired from civil registration and were followed up to evaluate their accuracy. It was found from this study that incompleteness of death registration and incorrect age recording were the main causes of the inflated figures of centenarians found in registration data in Thailand.

Keywords: elderly, centenarian, survival ratio, incompleteness of civil registration, Thailand


1 Ph.D. candidate, Doctoral Degree Program in Demography, Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University, Thailand. Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
2-4 Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University, Thailand
5 Sociology Department, University of Washington, Seattle, USA

We would like to thank The Royal Golden Jubilee Ph.D. Program, The Thailand Research Fund, for providing scholarship of the research upon which this paper is based. We thank the National Statistical Office of Thailand,Department of Provincial Administration for providing the data. We also thank all teachers, colleagues, and staffs from the Institute for Population and Social Research (IPSR) for their moral support and guidance. Finally, we greatly appreciate cooperation of all elder persons who participated in the field study.

 

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Volume 20 Number 2: January 2012

The Impact of Parental Migration on the Health of Children Living Separately from Parents: A Case Study of Kanchanaburi, Thailand

Ramesh Adhikari1, Aree Jampaklay2, Aphichat Chamratrithirong3, Kerry Richter4 and Umaporn Pattaravanich5

An increasing number of parents are migrating to seek jobs elsewhere while leaving young children in the care of others, and little is known about the consequences for children. This study examines the impact of parental out-migration on the physical health of children left behind. Data for this paper were taken from the 2007 survey of migration and health from Kanchanaburi, Thailand. A total of 11,241 children who have both parents were included in the survey. The study found that 14.5% of children had either one or both migrant parents. Overall, 25.5% of all children had an illness during the month prior to the survey. Analysis reveals that having one migrant parent was independently associated with a higher likelihood of an illness (odds ratio of mother migrant children = 1.37; odds ratio of father migrant children =1.23) than those with no parents or both parents migrating. The findings suggest that strategies to alleviate the negative impact of parental migration as well as to maintain and enhance the well-being of families, especially of the children left behind are warranted.

 

Keywords: parental migration, children living separately, child health


1 Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University, Thailand Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
2-5 Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University, Thailand

The authors thank the Wellcome Trust for providing a Wellcome Trust-IPSR Scholarship to the first author to pursue doctoral degree studies in Demography at the Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University, and giving the opportunity to use KDSS data from the Migration and Health Survey, 2007. Special thanks go to all teachers and colleagues at IPSR for their valuable suggestions for this paper.

 

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